Mobility Devices: Canes, Walkers, Wheelchairs, Scooters, and the Like

Scooter

Mobility Devices Do I need one?

Deciding when to use a mobility device is often difficult – especially when your physician doesn’t mention it. You may often find yourself questioning as to whether you should continue to push yourself. After all, wouldn’t your rheumatologist suggest using a cane, walker, scooter, etc if you really needed it?

Canes

To determine if you need a cane or not, think about these things. Do you have pain on one side of your body? Weakness on one side? Do you need help with balance? 1http://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0815/p412.html Or do you hold to furniture and walls as you walk? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, a cane might help you.

Walkers

Walker

If you have balance issues, you may need a walker. When you’re off balance, a cane usually isn’t enough to keep you upright when walking, but a walker, either one like the one pictured or one with the four wheels may be what you need to help you keep your balance.2http://www.aafp.org/afp/2011/0815/p412.html Also, if you it exhausts you to walk very far, and the more you walk, the higher the risk of stumbling, you might opt for a walker with a seat.

Wheelchair or Mobility Scooter

Scooter

But I can walk? Isn’t it wrong for me to use a wheelchair or a scooter? No! If you have low stamina, difficulty walking distances, or if you have trouble managing a walker or cane, you may need a mobility scooter. This is also a good option for those on oxygen or with chronic joint pain.3https://www.verywell.com/do-you-need-a-mobility-scooter-1094636

When shopping for groceries, walking the mall, going to a museum, or going to a theme park with your family, are you relegated to waiting in the car, or sitting on the sidelines because you can’t walk distances? If so, you might want to think about using a wheelchair or a scooter.

Wheelchairs and scooters can provide incredible freedom for those who have fatigue and pain from autoimmune diseases. Bus systems and taxis must provide space for your scooter or wheelchair, so using public transportation is an available option.

Medicare and some insurances will pay for a scooter if your physician signs off on the paperwork. Most places that sell them can tell you what you need in order to file against Medicare or private insurance.

But My Doctor Didn’t Recommend It…

Remember when dealing with your health and autoimmune diseases, you must become your own advocate. Talk to your doctor about your symptoms. Explain that you think a mobility device would help you.

Of course, you do not have to have your doctor’s permission for a mobility device since they are sold over the counter. However, if you want insurance or Medicare to pay for your mobility devices, or you want to take the cost off on your taxes, then you’ll need to ask your rheumy to sign off.