Gimpy Gal

Disabled or Not? Part Two

In my last post, I discussed how someone can look fine, yet be profoundly disabled. I shared my story of living with autoimmune diseases for many years.

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Today, I would like to discuss what those disabilities cannot do. They cannot:

  • Steal my faith or my joy. Yes, I have days where I get down because of the changes in my life. However, I still have joy. The Bible tells us we’ll have troubles. Jesus never promised that our lives on earth would be pain-free, but He does promise to walk through the valleys with us. “I will never leave you, nor forsake you.” Since my trust is in Christ, my joy rests in him also.
  • Rob me of laughter. I choose to laugh every day. My husband cannot go a day without making a joke. Even in troubled times, we laugh together. No matter the situation, we can find a sliver of happiness and laughter.
  • Snatch love from me. I know people who’ve had spouses leave them over their diseases, and I’m not making light of that, but disabilities cannot steal the love of my family. Mostly, it cannot steal the love of my Lord. He’s promised to love me forever. In fact, “love” is one of the most used words in the Bible. Disabilities cannot steal my love for others. Jesus commanded us to love others – including our enemies. Having multiple health issues isn’t an excuse to not love others. Hurting and feeling bad doesn’t give me a pass on reaching out in love.
  • Change who I am. Health issues may change the things I can do. I may spend more time sleeping, and more time recovering from activities, but they cannot change who I am. My inner being. The part of me God created, illness cannot change.

Yes, I’ve lost much because of my chronic illnesses, but I’ve also gained much.

  • Patience – waiting for medical procedures and insurance is teaching me patience. While I’m still not nearly as patient as I should be, I’m learning.
  • Understanding – As nurse, when I first became ill, it gave me more empathy toward my patients. Now, I try to have more empathy towards those who don’t understand. When I have friends who make hurtful comments, I remind myself that they don’t understand what I’m going through. At times, my understanding flies out the window, but I’m trying to be more understanding and forgiving of others.
  • To be still. I used to stay on the go day and night. Being still was foreign to me. I didn’t know how to sit quietly and just be still. I didn’t want to be alone with my thoughts. Now, I’m learning to sit still and listen, but I’m better. God tells us to be still and listen to Him. I’m still working on sitting quietly and just listening to Him but having a chronic illness is teaching me to sit still.

I’ve been guilty of saying, “I have no life anymore.” Yet, nothing could be further from the truth. I have an incredible life. It’s changed drastically over the years, and I can no longer do many of the things I used to do, but I still have a good life.

Years ago we went on a cruise, and I chose shore excursions like climbing the Dunn’s River Falls or parasailing. ParasailingDunn's River Falls

Now, if we go on a cruise or a trip, I choose things that are easier. We took an Alaska cruise, and we didn’t go on any shore excursions. I used my scooter, and we explored the towns. While we didn’t spend long at any stop because I tire easily, we still had fun. Alaska

We spent a lot of time watching out our balcony windows and saw many beautiful sights like whales and icebergs.

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My life has changed, but it is still a good one. God has richly blessed me in many ways. My prayer for you, if you find yourself with a chronic illness, is that you would look outside of the disabilities and see the good, beautiful parts of life that are left. The sunsets, the flowers that bloom in your neighborhood, the sound of the birds calling to each other in the trees – – find joy in the small things.

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